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mikeyrjiom
(@mikeyrjiom)
Hobbyist
Rep Points: 64
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 25
04/02/2019 9:33 am  

Hi Guys

As I'm still really a newbie to the guitar building with Mark. I just need to be a sponge and soak up anything and everything so this forum is really helpful.

The workshop tools etc just take time and money to put together. Maybe a run down of the basic tools required or will that be in the courses section ? I have ideas about the basics I need but finding where to get the plans and templates from would be a big help.

Mark you said you were contemplating CNC to sell through the website, any further thoughts on that?


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John L
(@johnnierox)
Crafter
Rep Points: 755
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 224
04/02/2019 11:47 am  

Hey Mike, I can only talk about the courses I’ve done so here goes. 

Since meeting Mark (online), I have completed the Design your own Guitar and Build your own Guitar (electric). I have not got to the Acoustic build yet, I’m having too much fun building electric guitars at the moment. 

Within the course there is a full list of essential tools and materials needed to complete a guitar build. This is all for electric guitar and to build it at home in a garage or workshop. I can’t put the full list up here as it is part of the paid course (or sold separately in the shop on the website). However I will talk about some of the main tools as part of a review. The tools that will help the most are a bandsaw and a router with the correct blades and bits. Some specialist tools are required such as a levelling beam, straight edge, fret rocker, radius gauges etc. Mark’s checklist gives you everything you need to get started and as you progress you get to know about addition and optional tools for the future. The course also suggests various suppliers of where to purchase tools and materials. Don’t forget the Mark has some materials, products and tools for sale and will help you find what you are looking for. 

So my advice is, whichever course you want to do first, buy it! Once you have bought it, spend time with the checklist (included) and get everything on it before starting work on a guitar. Make sure you have in your possession all of the guitar parts you want to use - bridge, tuners, nut etc. - these need to be part of the design stage and will affect the actual building of the guitar. There are lot of different guitar parts out there, so if you design for a particular bridge, for example, and then change your mind for another one half way through the build, it could seriously affect the tuning and/or playability of the guitar.

Everything will be fine though, Mark is the master and he will help you every step of the way. I was really nervous at first as I was doing it online instead of in Mark’s workshop (which I still haven’t been to) but I am now going to be starting my 3rd build. I made a few mistakes along the way but Master Yoda (I mean Mark) is there to help. 

Good luck with everything and welcome to the forum.

John. 

Carpe Diem and build your dreams


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Adam
 Adam
(@pinneradam)
Newbie
Rep Points: 3
Joined:2022 years ago
Posts: 1
17/02/2019 9:10 pm  

I'd love to see how to make a bolt on neck, a multi laminate thru neck and maybe a paint spraying course. 


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mark bailey
(@markbailey)
Guitar Making God
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 436
18/02/2019 12:34 pm  

Cheers Adam - added!

Measure twice, cut once...


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Mike of Loughton
(@michael-walker002)
Newbie
Rep Points: 4
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 3
22/03/2019 6:35 pm  

Mark

I would like to see you do an archtop guitar. I am looking at the Benedetto book and collecting tools and jigs in anticipation.

Regards

Mike Walker


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mateyboy
(@mateyboy)
Hobbyist
Rep Points: 72
Joined:9 months ago
Posts: 32
12/10/2019 3:41 pm  

I see this is an old post but... I'd like to see a paint spraying course. 🙂


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jamesalexandermcmillan
(@jamesalexandermcmillan)
Newbie
Rep Points: 2
Joined:10 months ago
Posts: 1
13/06/2020 10:21 am  

What abut

binding an electric guitar body (or neck)?

recovering from mistakes/ faults in the wood

strange requests that you have made for someone 

problems with a double neck

Jim

 


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mark bailey
(@markbailey)
Guitar Making God
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 436
13/06/2020 12:21 pm  
Posted by: @jamesalexandermcmillan

What abut

binding an electric guitar body (or neck)?

recovering from mistakes/ faults in the wood

strange requests that you have made for someone 

problems with a double neck

Jim

 

Great suggestions Jim - Added - THANKS!!

 

Measure twice, cut once...


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Bill Flude
(@frocesterbill)
Semi Professional
Rep Points: 454
Joined:1 year ago
Posts: 248
13/06/2020 12:33 pm  

Can faux binding be added as well......

 

Measure once........
Measure again.........
Sod it - make tea!


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Russ
 Russ
(@russ)
Semi Professional
Rep Points: 257
Joined:3 weeks ago
Posts: 36
13/06/2020 5:44 pm  

Hi Mark and Carole, 

I'm enjoying your Youtube Live Streaming. Would you be able to show us how to fit a truss rod to a bolt on Tele/Strat style neck with the access at the nut end of the fretboard. 

Cheers, 

Russ

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Russ

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darrenking
(@darrenking)
Technician
Rep Points: 532
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 201
15/06/2020 1:37 pm  

Hi Mark,

How about a simplified explanation of how to voice a soundboard? This is definitely one of the black arts of guitar making but I have yet to see any good description of what is trying to be achieved and how to go about it. If the plan is to get the soundboard sounding more like it did without braces then at what point do you stop thinning them down before they disappear altogether? Clearly this is a fairly subjective process but a bit of a practical overview would be fantastic!

Cheers

Darren


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Russ
 Russ
(@russ)
Semi Professional
Rep Points: 257
Joined:3 weeks ago
Posts: 36
15/06/2020 10:10 pm  

Hi Mark/Carole,

I saw on one of your recent YouTube Live streams that you get your Bailey Logo made by Small Wonder and inlay it but have you ever used Decals and if so would you be able to show us how to apply them?

Cheers,

Russ

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Russ

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mark bailey
(@markbailey)
Guitar Making God
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 436
16/06/2020 1:34 pm  
Posted by: @darrenking

Hi Mark,

How about a simplified explanation of how to voice a soundboard? This is definitely one of the black arts of guitar making but I have yet to see any good description of what is trying to be achieved and how to go about it.

Me neither...I have seen a lot of baloney...I'll see what I can do...

Measure twice, cut once...


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Russ
 Russ
(@russ)
Semi Professional
Rep Points: 257
Joined:3 weeks ago
Posts: 36
18/06/2020 11:45 am  

Hi Mark,

You've demonstrated shaping the guitar body using a router and a template which looks fairly straightforward but would you be able to show us how to accurately shape the template from the guitar drawing.

Cheers,

Russ 🎶😁🎸


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darrenking
(@darrenking)
Technician
Rep Points: 532
Joined:2 years ago
Posts: 201
19/06/2020 1:58 pm  

Hi Russ,

I'm working with Mark with the aim of him being able to supply CNC machined templates of (eventually) all the Bailey designs.

If you are making your own template by hand from a drawing then I would suggest either 6mm or 9mm MDF and then bandsaw/jigsaw, plane, scrape and sand it to the desired shape. The better you are at bandsaw/jigsawing the less work you'll have to clean it up but it shouldn't take too long. With curved shapes you will be able to pick up high spots or inaccuracies in the shape more easily by running your fingers along the edge rather than just looking at it. You shouldn't feel any bumps, hollows or strange transitions an you will be amazed at just how small a deviation you can detect and correct this way. Transferring the drawing to the MDF in the first place can be done either by copying the plan and sticking it down on your blank, using a pin to prick the design through into the MDF before joining the dots (it does mean ending up with a perforated plan) or by penciling (B or 2B) over the outline and then rubbing this face down onto you blank. The transferred line won't be photocopier sharp but it should be good enough once you cleaned it up a little by going over it again. You can also hold the plan against a window and pencil the lines onto the back of the plan if there are details that you need to transfer without them being reversed.

Have fun!

Darren


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