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Strap peg screw has stripped out - fixes  

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jamesbisset
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26/11/2020 9:25 pm  

So, there I was swanning roon the hoose, with my restored, vintage US built Peavey Generation S3 chambered tele swung over my shoulder and hanging down my back.

And then, all of a sudden, the bottom strap peg screw stripped out and the guitar took a dive for the floor, head first.

Only these finely tuned, highly strung reflexes saved the guitar from catastrophe, because I was halfway up the stairs at the time.

I have a small collection of lengths of dowel, so I drilled out a 6mm hole and pushed in a piece of 6mm dowel. Of course, the dowel isn’t perfectly circular, and I suspect the hole isn’t either. The dowel is a tight fit further in, but there is an unsightly gap.

P1000290
P1000291

So,

a) I could flood the gap with superglue and drop in some sawdust but I’m not convinced that’s going to be strong enough for my rock n’ roll ways.

b) Drill out an 8mm hole and fit an 8mm dowel with Titebond. That would give me more surface contact between dowel and alder body and stronger support. Or would I just get a bigger uneven hole?

Other solutions invited!

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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darrenking
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27/11/2020 1:15 am  

Hi James, you could add a wooden or leather washer to cover the dowel hole. Or polished stainless, they would all cover the hole and look cool.

Cheers

Darren


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darrenking
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27/11/2020 1:22 am  

Or you could plug the hole with a dowel, drill a 20mm (for example) recess a couple of mm deep, fit whatever inlay takes your fancy and then drill a new pilot hole for the the button screw.

Darren


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Robin
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27/11/2020 10:53 am  

You could also use a longer screw that will go in beyond the repair if you're concerned about the strength of the glued plug.


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Edwin
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27/11/2020 11:32 am  
evh frankenstein 00 bottom strap hook

Or do as the late, great Eddie did......

Measure once, cut straight away and maybe you're lucky......


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jamesbisset
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27/11/2020 2:19 pm  

Thanks all. 😀 

That’s helped clear my thinking. Right enough, I’m most concerned about the strength of the glued plug. And I can’t use a longer screw because there’s a chamber 30-40mm in. Although if I extend the plug...

As long as the plug isn’t too big I don’t need to worry about the cosmetics - the plug will be hidden behind the button.

But I don’t trust a plug that’s tight at one end and loose at the other, even if it’s packed with superglue and sawdust.

I’ll try the 8mm plug. And extend it into the chamber. And use a longer screw.

Hmmm.... Rawlplug?

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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Rocknroller912
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27/11/2020 2:33 pm  

@jamesbisset

I would glue in a temporary dowel as a starting point then use a brad point or spade drill bit with a point to get a true round hole. Find the centre of the dowel before you glue it in and mark it with a punch or other point. 

When you get near the finish there is a probability that it will chip, so you should go very slowly either using a hand drill or holding the bit by hand. You might be able to soften the finish a bit by dabbing a small amount of solvent around the hole, if you know what the finish is.

The dowel could be a contrasting piece of wood like ebony or rosewood so it looks like a feature and not a mistake. If you haven't got a lathe then dowels are not too hard to make. Take a square bit of wood and shave the corners to make 8 sides, put it in a drill chuck and round with sand paper. I could make a piece and post it if you get  stuck as I have loads of scraps.


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jamesbisset
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27/11/2020 3:38 pm  

@rocknroller912

I would glue in a temporary dowel as a starting point then use a brad point or spade drill bit with a point to get a true round hole. Find the centre of the dowel before you glue it in and mark it with a punch or other point. 

Now that - that sounds like a plan!

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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mark bailey
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29/11/2020 10:29 am  

...or use epoxy resin - excellent gap filling properties - clean up excess with methylated sprits (maybe test on a small hidden area of finish to be sure - and mask up around the hole for extra safety)

The strap stud will cover the dowel - job done.

Measure twice, cut once...


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jamesbisset
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11/12/2020 4:44 pm  

I glued in the 6mm dowel, drilled a pilot hole and then drilled out a 10mm hole with an old brad point bit. I only needed to go in about 20mm because the 6mm dowel was thoroughly bedded in at the tight end.

Still managed to get a loose hole with the 10mm dowel, so in it went with two pack epoxy. Blunt bit? I’m beginning to realise that tools need to be sharpened regularly, or just replaced. You can’t keep a collection of bits in a box for twenty years and still expect quality.

strap peg plug

I’m going to get scuff marks while sanding down the plug. If only I could lay my hands on some kind of cross between a chisel and a knife. Y’know, something with an angled blade that was really sharp.

Hmmm... 

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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Rocknroller912
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11/12/2020 6:59 pm  

@jamesbisset

Sorry to read that you didn't get a great result. You could try trimming the dowel using a sharp knife, chisel or gouge by starting from the edge and cutting towards the centre. That way you are working away from the finish and less likely to mark it. If you have one of Mark's guitar makers knives it would work if you get into a good working position say with the instrument vertical so that you can turn it round.


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tv1
 tv1
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11/12/2020 7:43 pm  

If only I could lay my hands on some kind of cross between a chisel and a knife.

Small flush-cut saw?  One of the Japanese things that Rutlands sell perhaps?

 

like this chap ...

https://www.rutlands.com/sp+gyokucho-japanese-flush-cutting-hand-saw-single-edge-100mm+JP1017?tyah=y

Online guitar making courses – guitarmaking.co.uk


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jamesbisset
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11/12/2020 10:31 pm  

Small flush-cut saw?  One of the Japanese things that Rutlands sell perhaps?

Oooo...

Shhhh - it’s cheaper too!

(although you can sharpen a guitar maker’s knife - a tool for life)

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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tv1
 tv1
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12/12/2020 9:51 am  

Oooo...

Shhhh - it’s cheaper too!

(although you can sharpen a guitar maker’s knife - a tool for life)

Different tools for different jobs really.

I mean, you *could* make a guitar from raw wood with just a screwdriver and a guitar builder's knife, but it'd be a bit easier if you also had* a guitar maker's rasp to hand.

I love my Japanese saws for precision cutting.  I haven't actually got one of those smaller ones (yet), but I saw them in a recent mailshot from Rutlands, and they're on my list!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* If you really wanted to cheat, then you'd have at least one of everything in the StewMac catalogue too.

Online guitar making courses – guitarmaking.co.uk


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jamesbisset
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12/12/2020 1:08 pm  

Sorry to read that you didn't get a great result.

My own fault. I dug out an old bit and didn’t test it first on a piece of scrap. 

Check twice and cut once!

Jack of all trades and master of my own destiny. It’s only a small destiny.


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