Finishing without darkening the wood  

Page 2 / 2 Prev
  RSS

Carnivorous HERBivore
(@herb)
Adept
Rep Points:243
Hero:193
Joined:4 months ago
Posts: 62
19/01/2019 10:54 am  

OK - I've tried a 50/50 poly/white spirit rub. Nice finish but still darkens the "Wenge" considerably.

But...

I think I may have found the answer...

Sanding to > 320 grit and then Renaissance Wax. At first it darkened the wood and I was sad but when it dried the magic happened and we're almost back to the original wood colour. I think it'll seal the wood and, when buffed, has a nice satin sheen.

If this doesn't work I'll try (water-based) white chalk paint then sand back to just reveal the lovely grain and seal with the poly rub.

any thoughts most welcome...


mark bailey and John L liked
Reply ReplyQuote
John L
(@johnnierox)
Technician
Rep Points:503
Hero:141
Joined:4 months ago
Posts: 165
20/01/2019 3:02 pm  

I wish I could help you Herb but I don’t have any experience with any of these products. 

Is this a wipe on poly then? What make of poly do you use?

I want to make a good wipe on poly and if I mix it with white spirit so it is thinner, this will then be ready to wipe on? 

Carpe Diem and build your dreams


Reply ReplyQuote
Carnivorous HERBivore
(@herb)
Adept
Rep Points:243
Hero:193
Joined:4 months ago
Posts: 62
20/01/2019 3:46 pm  

I used an oil-based poly varnish from Toolstation and mixed it 50/50 with white spirit. Unfortunately wenge seems to darken considerably at the slightest sniff of solvent. Even the wax darkened it initially.


John L liked
Reply ReplyQuote
darrenking
(@darrenking)
Adept
Rep Points:107
Hero:67
Joined:2 months ago
Posts: 42
20/01/2019 11:55 pm  

Anything that soaks in is going to darken the wood be it wenge, cherry or sycamore. You are trying to achieve something that every finishing company and the vast majority of instrument/furniture/cabinet makers are trying to avoid. That there isn’t a massive database of suggestions of how to make finished wood look dry and the grain display no depth really doesn’t surprise me. Maybe some kind of limed wax finish could help lighten some areas of grain to compensate for the darkening of others. How about just leaving the surface sanded and let it pick up a patina through handling and age. Could be an interesting process to document over the years.

Regards

Darren


Reply ReplyQuote
Carnivorous HERBivore
(@herb)
Adept
Rep Points:243
Hero:193
Joined:4 months ago
Posts: 62
21/01/2019 10:58 am  

Unless I get alarms from you guys I think I'm going to fine sand and rub in a few coats of Renaissance Wax. That seems to retain a lighter colour in the wood, maximising the contrast of the grain and should seal the wood and give some protection... anyone throwing their hands up in horror?

Thanks for all your input


mark bailey liked
Reply ReplyQuote
Edwin
(@e-den-hertog)
Adept
Rep Points:107
Hero:153
Joined:2021 years ago
Posts: 35
21/01/2019 12:14 pm  

I must say that my experience with wipe on poly is based on usage with maple, pine and rosewood.... Not with wenge.... Too bad you didn't get the result you're looking for....

 

Measure once, cut straight away and maybe you're lucky......


John L liked
Reply ReplyQuote
mark bailey
(@markbailey)
Guitar Making God
Hero:9999836
Joined:10 months ago
Posts: 116
21/01/2019 4:15 pm  

Hey Herb - It would be great to see some pics? 🧐 

Don't be surprised if it gets darker with more coats... 🙄 

This post was modified 1 month ago by mark bailey

Measure twice, cut once...


John L liked
Reply ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2 Prev