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syntholabo
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18/10/2019 6:48 pm  

I've been searching for a while for advice on finishing with Osmo, because I'm petrified of spraying nitrocellulose in an inadequate environment for safety and quality's sake.

I want to know how much preparation with grain filler and sealer is required with Osmo oil finish.

https://www.wood-finishes-direct.com said this:

"Thank you for getting in touch.

We do not really have anything that is a grain filler and we cannot say that the products we recommend will work with it, as it may prevent the filler from absorbing as expected however test areas will be required to ascertain compatibility.
For a smooth finish for instruments, many craftsmen often use Nitrocellulose Lacquer Sprays with many coats to achieve this finish yet this is a trade only product as it is a carcinogenic and requires application with professional safety equipment and practice with using.
We can recommend to take a look at the polyx oil for a test area with 2 thin coats providing sufficient protection but with test areas with any product being used prior. We do not stock grain fillers so we cannot confidently recommend to use them together.
I hope this helps and should you require further advice, please do not hesitate to get back in touch.
Kind Regards,
Emily"
 

I also wrote to this chap a while ago:

It all comes down to the finish

He finally got back to me with a helpful answer:

"You can use a water based grain filler under Osmo, such as timber mate. I would not use a clear filler such as epoxy, ca, or aqua cote as the filled sections of grain will be glossier than the surrounding area due to the fact the osmo will not absorb into these areas. Also Osmo is it’s own sealer /base coat so no need to seal with anything else, remember it’s an oil and wax concoction so treat it as you would oil.

I use it only on open grain matte or satin finishes, it looks very natural and is super easy to apply. Wipe on then wipe off, do not roller it on the top as it will end up too thick.

Good Luck

Jens"

 


darrenking
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18/10/2019 9:26 pm  

Hi there,

I have used Osmo oils for about 15 years and they are far superior to the old Danish oil primarily because they don’t get sticky anywhere near as quickly and so you don’t get all of those fibers pulled out of the wiping cloth stuck to the surface before the oil has fully soaked in. For the sake of uniformity of finish I would advise against a grain filler as this will seal off the surface and prevent the oils penetrating and bringing out the depth of grain. Wipe it on and rub it in with a fairly generous application and then wipe as much as possible off again. Leave to dry for 24 hours and then repeat. You are never going to achieve a completely smooth surface with a couple coats but if you keep going with additional applications, knocked back with very fine steel wool each time you will end up filling most of the grain and a beautiful satin finish. For furniture I then apply a beeswax product such as Bison wax or Lord Sheratons, let it dry and then buff with a cotton rag. Not sure this applies to guitars though but if you want a little more shine....

Osmo have some great products but if you can’t find them then the Fiddes versions are an almost exact alternative.

Cheers

Darren


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syntholabo
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19/10/2019 2:52 pm  

Thanks Darren, excellent.

I have a bunch of Osmo samples, and have already used the Polyx Raw onmy lovely maple floor.

I'm thinking I won't mind a bit of darkenung since this first build is pure pale all over.

One question- do you do the fretboard in Osmo as well?

 


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syntholabo
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19/10/2019 10:19 pm  

Talking of ultra-fine steel wool...

Mark- you mention 00000 grade in the videos. Did you mean 0000?

That's wat i got cos thats all there iz


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mark bailey
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20/10/2019 2:10 pm  

@syntholabo

Yup - Axminster say '0000' so we'll go with that for now...I never was very good at maths

Measure twice, cut once...


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syntholabo
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04/11/2019 1:42 pm  

Hey gang.

I've decided to Osmo. Matt or Satin to be decided.

Before I do the neck, does anyone know how a decal stands up to oiling / waxing? Is there a preferred way to get a logo on if this is not recommended?


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darrenking
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04/11/2019 2:29 pm  

 I think I would have to say that it depends on the material the decal is made of and how it has been printed. Ideally you would make an inlaid logo from contrasting veneer as this is likely to take the oil finish well and create an even surface. If the decal is one of the ones that you float off on water and then apply I would suggest doing this after the oiling is complete and totally dry.

Regards
Darren


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syntholabo
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09/11/2019 1:53 pm  

@darrenking

Right- five applications of Osmo satin, with ultra-fine wool rubs in between.

There's a mild lustre on the back and sides, and a nice oiled colour on the spruce top.

Back and sides are lovely and smooth but the top is bumpy along the grain.

Keep going with more Osmo?


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