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[Solved] Whoopsie  

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tv1
 tv1
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04/07/2020 5:02 pm  

I always like to learn something new on each build.

Often the "learn something new" is preceded by me ballsing something up, to which I then need to devise a cunning fix.

And here's the whoopsie on this build.  It's a hollowbody, with the hollow created by routing out a large part of the 35mm thick top, onto which I've glued a 10mm back.

Back looks good ...

20200704 163959

But due to a non-functioning ruler (or my inability to measure correctly), I've sanded into the inside of the body ...

20200704 163940
20200704 163946

... which is my opportunity to devise a cunning fix.  The hole is about 15mm by 5mm.

 

My current thoughts;

1.  Make it into an as-if-deliberate feature by cutting some matching holes in, more or less where I've indicated with the white pencil.

2.  Hide it by cutting a hole in the back, gluing a piece of wood onto the underside and then filling the hole with wood dust & glue.  Downside is that it'll still be quite obvious as there's some strong grain pattern running through the area, and I'll have to cut a hole in the back.

3.  Hide it by inserting some inlay.  I'd try to create some sort of semi-random pattern of inlays, and scatter them across the top of the guitar, rather than just into the hole.  Downside is that I'll probably still need to glue a piece of wood onto the underside to support the inlay.

 

Any other suggestions oh wise ones?

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Deej
 Deej
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06/07/2020 8:38 pm  

I was thinking option 1. 

I have too many guitars...said no one in the world..ever!


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tv1
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06/07/2020 8:40 pm  

I'm currently attempted option 4.

That's like option 2, but without cutting a hole in the back to get access to the underside of the hole.

Step 1 has worked (I've got a piece of wood glued in place), and I've just applied step 2 (filling the gap).  We'll see how - whether - that's worked in the morning ...

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Bill Flude
(@frocesterbill)
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06/07/2020 9:06 pm  

Think option one would work.........

Measure once........
Measure again.........
Sod it - make tea!


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mark bailey
(@markbailey)
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07/07/2020 11:41 am  

That's bad luck...fingers crossed for the repair. At least you have option 1 as a fall back - and if all else fails

Measure twice, cut once...


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mark bailey
(@markbailey)
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07/07/2020 11:47 am  

Another option might be to cut off a section of the body and glue a new piece on - if you have an offcut from the body blank it might work...

Measure twice, cut once...


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tv1
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07/07/2020 1:39 pm  

OK ... here's whats happened so far.

1.  A bit of precision sawing.  I love my Japanese saws.  This is a tiny piece of offcut.

 

2.  Lets put a screw in it.

 

 

3.  The screw is just to give something to hold onto when getting the offcut into place, and dolloping superglue on each end, then pulling it upwards to glue against the underside of the cap

 

 

Next task - mix up some wood glue and wood dust and smooth it over the hole.

 

That's all pretty much non-destructive.  It it fails for any reason, then I'll probably go with the option of cutting some matching slits/fins into the rest of the cap and turn it into a feature.

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tv1
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23/08/2020 10:31 am  

It took some time.

And then some more time.

Mix up the glue & wood dust, cover the hole, sand and then sand some more.  Then mix up some more glue & wood dust and re-cover the hole, and then sand just enough (and not some more).

And ...

20200823 101403

... hole?  What hole??

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tv1
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31/08/2020 10:29 am  

Count me happy with the outcome on this ...

DSC 2849
DSC 2847
DSC 2848

 

But how about the back ...

DSC 2846

I've long wanted to make a cavity cover that properly matched the grain of the body, and you'll not get a better match than that.

?

Points for anyone who figures out how I did it ...

 

(I've got a chromed string ferrule block to fit in the hole - recessed so it sits flush with the back of the body).

Online guitar making courses – guitarmaking.co.uk


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Robin
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31/08/2020 10:49 am  

@tv1010101 I've just been reading about inkjet waterslide transfers. Someone had made woodgrain effect transfers, I think it was for a model railway wagon.  How about taking a photo of the cavity area before you route it. Then make a waterslide transfer using the photo, apply to your cavity cover and in theory you have a perfect match. Iv'e no idea if this would work, it's just a suggestion. 


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tv1
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31/08/2020 10:58 am  

@robin

I think that would work!

I did something similar on this LPJr build ...

https://guitarmaking.co.uk/community/hints-tips/lp-jr-hiding-a-neck-join/

Took a photo of the neck join area, photoshopped it to extend the body grain pattern over the neck tenon (ie the neck tenon disappeared in the edited photo), then sent the image off to be printed on 3mm acrylic. 

Cut the acrylic into the scratchplate shape, and job's a good 'un!

The trick was taking an accurate photo - it had to be perpendicular to the body to avoid any perspective effect in the finished article.

 

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Robin
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31/08/2020 11:14 am  

@tv1010101  I had thought that your scratch plate was another clever peice of wood. So you've answered your own question, having the photo printed on acrylic sounds simpler than waterslide transfers.


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Deej
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10/09/2020 10:46 pm  

It’s a very clever idea @TV1010101

I have too many guitars...said no one in the world..ever!


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