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When the truss rod went in deeper than you remembered ...

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rockpile99
(@rockpile99)
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26/01/2021 9:27 pm  

I'll try and tune in to the Live tomorrow (missed the last few weeks because work has been so busy).

Here are a couple more pictures 

IMG 20210126 210820

Had this been my previous truss rod purchases which were 9mm high I still would have had at least 3mm of wood.

IMG 20210126 210851

I guess the lessons learned (apart from don't take too wood you plonker) are to not to "buy truss rods because they're in stock and you have a child free weekend coming up" and to write down how deep the truss rod channel actually ended up and keep the information handy for when you carve.

Guitar making is the art and science of turning expensive wood into sawdust.


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tv1
 tv1
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27/01/2021 4:39 pm  

I know the neck is now firewood but does anyone have any tips to get he fretboard off without distroying it? 

I did do that once - really just as an experiment to find out whether I could or not.

You're supposed to be able to do it by melting / loosening the glue.  Apply an iron to the frets, and let the heat work through the fretboard and into the glue layer.  As the glue loosens, try to work a blade (scraper) into the joint between fretboard and neck, and then gradually work your way up the fretboard, applying heat, loosening the glue and moving the scraper further up the neck.

You can also try removing some frets, drilling a (very) small hole in the fret slot and injecting steam, but that requires a bit more kit.

I took the fairly blunt approach of rigging up a jig to hold the neck vertically (along it's length) and then using the bandsaw to cut the fretboard off.  That's going to leave a bit of gunk on the underside of the board which then needs cleaning off, and you have to be *very* careful not to cut into the fretboard - but it worked.

 

That said, it's a load of aggro, and you'll probably need to re-level the frets when you re-apply the saved fretboard to another neck, so might not be worth doing?

Online guitar making courses – guitarmaking.co.uk


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rockpile99
(@rockpile99)
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27/01/2021 5:59 pm  

Thanks TV1 🙂

The fretboard still has plenty of meat on it, so trying removal might be worth a shot. Hadn't leveled yet so no time lost there thankfully.

Will save it for a rainy/bored day mini project though I think...

Guitar making is the art and science of turning expensive wood into sawdust.


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mattbeels
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28/01/2021 8:55 pm  

After removing the fretboard it’s bound to go all wonky so if you were to reuse it you’d have to re-level the board and then refret it, ugh...

Remove it if you like for the experience but maybe Mark’s suggestion as an ornament is best.

Be creative: it could make a cool door handle for your shop or cut off the headstock and use the tuner holes as tool holders. 

Have fun!

Pratice on scrap...


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Tej
 Tej
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07/04/2021 11:24 am  

For what it’s worth I’ve removed the fretboard from an Encore strat copy I was donated. The truss rod adjuster was destroyed and there was some damage around the adjuster access along with a small chip. So I replaced the truss rod in it and remade the surround for the adjuster and put it back together.

I used the technique of heating with an iron and sliding a paint scraper down which works but is quite brutal to say the least. I needed to level and dress the frets after but as a first attempt at this repair it was quite successful.

The fretboard came off quite cleanly though and didn’t need a lots of elbow grease to clean up.

 

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


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rockpile99
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11/04/2021 1:08 pm  

I was bored so I decided to give @Tej's suggestion a try. It took well over an hour and the fretboard will need a little more glue & dust in places but I've ended up with a usable fretboard (although probably for something where I want to experiment or maybe practice binding).

IMG 20210410 152919
IMG 20210411 124340

Guitar making is the art and science of turning expensive wood into sawdust.


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Tej
 Tej
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11/04/2021 4:41 pm  

@rockpile99 Glad it worked out ok, sorry should also have mentioned that it’s not at all quick, your results look pretty similar mind. I had a small chip to sort too and had to craft a new surround for the truss rod adjuster which added complication as it meant taking the finish off the headstock to get everything looking ok, the chip is too obvious but the experience is worth more than the guitar 🙂

For gluing the board back on I use the cut off head of two small nails and drilled a tiny hole in the back of the fret board using these to align it and then used the clamps on a dry run to press it into the right location. I’ve made a felt covered support that I also used which ment I could put more even pressure on the back of the neck while clamping too. Before sanding there was the tiniest extra fretboard (you could feel it but not see it) over both sides of the neck, still don’t quite understand why but sanded down to meet the body and is fine. A few pics below:

749BD809 B5A4 41D4 9510 AD1E64B2CFC1
C1E4DB26 1499 4527 9595 3AE0D155E0FE
AD1155DD 5376 4DEF 9C65 6601DA2EAEE0
BFC8FB0A A4E2 4E98 9EC8 6FF26B93BE04
6C65DBF6 1A62 43F8 A69F B13353A6AD48
73A3D0F9 6B45 463B AD35 6E04ACC9BCF3
542135DD AEAA 4CE1 86F6 492003B91557
948421A7 CE66 49BA AE13 CD03A61F6CB6

 

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


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