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When the truss rod went in deeper than you remembered ...  

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rockpile99
(@rockpile99)
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26/01/2021 9:27 pm  

I'll try and tune in to the Live tomorrow (missed the last few weeks because work has been so busy).

Here are a couple more pictures 

IMG 20210126 210820

Had this been my previous truss rod purchases which were 9mm high I still would have had at least 3mm of wood.

IMG 20210126 210851

I guess the lessons learned (apart from don't take too wood you plonker) are to not to "buy truss rods because they're in stock and you have a child free weekend coming up" and to write down how deep the truss rod channel actually ended up and keep the information handy for when you carve.

Guitar making is the art and science of turning expensive wood into sawdust.


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tv1
 tv1
(@tv101)
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27/01/2021 4:39 pm  

I know the neck is now firewood but does anyone have any tips to get he fretboard off without distroying it? 

I did do that once - really just as an experiment to find out whether I could or not.

You're supposed to be able to do it by melting / loosening the glue.  Apply an iron to the frets, and let the heat work through the fretboard and into the glue layer.  As the glue loosens, try to work a blade (scraper) into the joint between fretboard and neck, and then gradually work your way up the fretboard, applying heat, loosening the glue and moving the scraper further up the neck.

You can also try removing some frets, drilling a (very) small hole in the fret slot and injecting steam, but that requires a bit more kit.

I took the fairly blunt approach of rigging up a jig to hold the neck vertically (along it's length) and then using the bandsaw to cut the fretboard off.  That's going to leave a bit of gunk on the underside of the board which then needs cleaning off, and you have to be *very* careful not to cut into the fretboard - but it worked.

 

That said, it's a load of aggro, and you'll probably need to re-level the frets when you re-apply the saved fretboard to another neck, so might not be worth doing?

Online guitar making courses – guitarmaking.co.uk


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rockpile99
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27/01/2021 5:59 pm  

Thanks TV1 🙂

The fretboard still has plenty of meat on it, so trying removal might be worth a shot. Hadn't leveled yet so no time lost there thankfully.

Will save it for a rainy/bored day mini project though I think...

Guitar making is the art and science of turning expensive wood into sawdust.


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mattbeels
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28/01/2021 8:55 pm  

After removing the fretboard it’s bound to go all wonky so if you were to reuse it you’d have to re-level the board and then refret it, ugh...

Remove it if you like for the experience but maybe Mark’s suggestion as an ornament is best.

Be creative: it could make a cool door handle for your shop or cut off the headstock and use the tuner holes as tool holders. 

Have fun!

Pratice on scrap...


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