Share:
Notifications
Clear all

In the beginning we mark the nut...

Page 11 / 12

Rocknroller912
(@rocknroller912)
Luthier
Rep Points: 7739
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1068
 

@tej

Yes it makes a nice neat hole that you can plug

Some people call me a tool, others are less complimentary. Tools being useful things.


tv1, mattbeels, Boo and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 

Mr Talisker visited

@tej A very nice dram indeed. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🥂

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


tv1, mattbeels, Tej and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 

@tej Use a bit of bees wax on the threads of your screws to lubricate them and they will go in much easier. 👍

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


tv1, mattbeels, Tej and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  

There is an easy way to get broken screws out

@rocknroller912 Worked a treat, Mark suggested the same. If you overlook where the finish is a bit destroyed where I had to twist the pickup mount off it’ll be hidden under the mount. The finish isn’t as horrible as it looks I. Hopefully I can make that good.

AD0EC41A CC0F 43E4 B21F 663CD056924E
69625392 17F0 479A 8653 C2CD09A88B91
0B057255 914F 4FF7 9C3B 23B63F1BACB1

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, mattbeels, Rocknroller912 and 5 people liked
ReplyQuote
Rocknroller912
(@rocknroller912)
Luthier
Rep Points: 7739
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1068
 

@tej

Good job I’m glad that it worked for you. Being able to fix mistakes as they happen gives a lot more confidence when building. I always do a dry run fitting parts before any finishing to avoid things like broken screws. Also I never use power tools for soft metal screws as they chew the heads easily. 

Some people call me a tool, others are less complimentary. Tools being useful things.


tv1, mattbeels, Koendb and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  
Posted by: @rocknroller912

I always do a dry run fitting parts before any finishing to avoid things like broken screws

@rockneoller912 same here, all the times when things go right, that’s what happened 😬

Posted by: @rocknroller912

Also I never use power tools for soft metal screws as they chew the heads easily. 

Didn’t use power tools, just not used to hard woods and used an incompetently small pilot, clearly not the strongest of screws either mind 🙂

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Rocknroller912
(@rocknroller912)
Luthier
Rep Points: 7739
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1068
 

@tej

Looks like you’ve had a life time supply of bad luck all in one build. This should mean that your next ones will go with no problems.

Some people call me a tool, others are less complimentary. Tools being useful things.


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  
Posted by: @rocknroller912

Looks like you’ve had a life time supply of bad luck all in one build

@rocknroller912 I can honestly say I every mistake has been down to trying to rush something when I should have just come back to it the day after. That said I’ve learnt a lot from the screw ups, you’re right the next build will be less problematic for sure, at the same time though fixing the mistakes and still having a nice instrument at the end of it has absolutely been worth it.

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 5 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 
Posted by: @tej

Didn’t use power tools, just not used to hard woods and used an incompetently small pilot, clearly not the strongest of screws either mind 🙂

@tej My rule of thumb: whatever screws you want to use for whatever purpose, use your callipers to measure the “outside thread” width. If, for arguments sake, some scratch plate screws measured 3mm width. Use a 2.5mm drill bit to drill your pilot holes. Whatever the thread width measures on any screw, use a drill bit 0.5mm smaller. 👍

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 5 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  

@boo that’s a good system, annoyingly one that never occurred to me before!

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 

@tej Also, like I said earlier, put a small amount of bees wax on the thread of each screw. Doing this lubricates and eases the action of putting the screw in, it helps take strain off the screw. If the screws are not good quality, they will sheer off easily under that screwing and twisting action. So, reducing those forces as much as possible by drilling the correct sized pilot holes and lubricating the screw threads, vastly reduces the risk of snapping/breaking/sheering the screws. 👍

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


tv1, mattbeels, Robin and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 
Posted by: @tej

that’s a good system, annoyingly one that never occurred to me before!

@tej Yeah it took me a while to figure it out. Ask me how I know. 🤣👍

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


tv1, Koendb, mattbeels and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  

Right, so I’ve fixed the screw and the electrics, turns out it was down to a bad earth connection where I had a glut of wires coming together. Decided to take everything out and rewire outside the guitar so I could make much shorter wires. Now just the truss Rod adjuster cover to go, I’ve a few options but I’m thinking making one from an off cut or rosewood would actually look best, opinions welcome!? These are the other options but I’m not madly keen on any of them!

D962328C 55F4 4507 BE69 86A16D4EE96E
BF51C633 BF3B 4CB1 BEE5 F93F6E4BEDD5
13D52749 4C7E 4B5E A645 C650F0B2F03D

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, Russ, Koendb and 2 people liked
ReplyQuote
Boo
 Boo
(@boo)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 32076
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3626
 
Posted by: @tej

Right, so I’ve fixed the screw and the electrics, turns out it was down to a bad earth connection where I had a glut of wires coming together. Decided to take everything out and rewire outside the guitar so I could make much shorter wires. Now just the truss Rod adjuster cover to go, I’ve a few options but I’m thinking making one from an off cut or rosewood would actually look best, opinions welcome!? These are the other options but I’m not madly keen on any of them!

@tej They don’t always have to be symmetrical. I made an offset one for this guitar build. It’s made from plastic but it could be wood or metal I suppose. 

72420064 ADD3 48CA 8C68 AB65F0315675
495B910E 2F3A 4AA0 9AD0 A42BD4D6595A

Make guitars, not war 🌍✌️🎸


Russ, Koendb, mattbeels and 1 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  
Posted by: @boo

They don’t always have to be symmetrical.

@boo those were just the ones I’d picked up, for the wooden one I was contemplating a miniature version of the whole headstock, can’t decide if that’d look nice or a bit cheesy. I’m loathed to put plastic over it given all the lovely wood and chrome.

Incidentally to anyone reading this, be mindful of how much space you have to turn a hex key if you don’t have access straight in and need to use the small angled end like me, it’s pure luck that there is just enough room to turn the key and be able to relocate it!

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, Russ, Boo and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Robin
(@robin)
Luthier
Rep Points: 13035
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 869
 

@tej   I like to make the truss rod cover from wood to match the headstock. If you're going to have a scaled down headstock shape, maybe it would look good in a contrasting wood.


tv1, Russ, Boo and 2 people liked
ReplyQuote
mattbeels
(@mattbeels)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 18993
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1046
 

Great job @tej

For the truss rod cover my suggestion is to match the headstock so it blends in and doesn’t obscure that nice looking wood!

Practice on scrap...


tv1, Russ, Boo and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  

@robin I have maple or mahogany, could use the mahogany which would match the neck, I’ll mock one up and see how it goes.

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, Russ, Boo and 3 people liked
ReplyQuote
Tej
 Tej
(@tej)
Luthier
Rep Points: 5384
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 465
Topic starter  
Posted by: @mattbeels

match the headstock

@mattbeels this was where I was leaning before robin’s suggestion of still wood but contrasting, I can try both i suppose. I don’t want it to be too prominent, that chrome one definitely takes up too much space!

 

EDIT WORKS! What mysterious powers were at work to fix that!!

This post was modified 10 months ago 2 times by Tej

…on an elaborate journey to turn trees into music.


tv1, Russ, mattbeels and 2 people liked
ReplyQuote
mattbeels
(@mattbeels)
Customer
Luthier
Rep Points: 18993
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1046
 

So the edit button works?!? Awesome, now where’s that @tv101?

Practice on scrap...


Koendb, tv1, Bpower and 4 people liked
ReplyQuote
Page 11 / 12