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Robin's build #002

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Boo
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04/08/2021 7:09 pm  

I'll try to be patient and keep piling the coats on.

@robin I’m assuming you are using nitro in rattle cans, is that right? 

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Robin
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04/08/2021 8:15 pm  

@boo

I’m assuming you are using nitro in rattle cans, is that right?

I am using rattle cans, but not nitro. Its Plasikote clear gloss lacquer that I've got.


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Boo
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04/08/2021 8:47 pm  

I am using rattle cans, but not nitro. Its Plasikote clear gloss lacquer that I've got.

@robin Oh, I see. I haven’t used that before so I’m not sure. I would read about the application method on the can and don’t put too much on all in one day. I would probably gently sand after your four coats (when dry) and then clean and apply another four (maybe repeat again). The key thing is, don’t apply too much at once in a single day. Then leave it for several days to dry properly and then wet sand carefully and carefully polish it. When polishing, don’t spend too much time in one place for too long, move around constantly or you could burn through the lacquer and be particularly careful of the edges. Go slowly and be patient, you can get amazing results but painting can also be a cruel mistress. 

Good luck. 

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Robin
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04/08/2021 9:39 pm  

@boo

Thanks for the great advice. I've only put two coats on at a time so far and scuffed it with 400 grit after the first two. Its been fairly high temperatures and low humidity the last couple of days, I think thats going to change tomorrow, so I'll leave it to harden until the weather is favourable again before I scuff it and add some more lacquer. I won't be tempted to try and polish too soon because I've left my mop and polishing compound over in Argyll.


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Boo
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04/08/2021 10:40 pm  

Thanks for the great advice. I've only put two coats on at a time so far and scuffed it with 400 grit after the first two. Its been fairly high temperatures and low humidity the last couple of days, I think thats going to change tomorrow, so I'll leave it to harden until the weather is favourable again before I scuff it and add some more lacquer. I won't be tempted to try and polish too soon because I've left my mop and polishing compound over in Argyll.

@robin No probs. I think 400 is a bit too coarse, use 600 or 800, otherwise you will see those 400 scratches in your clear lacquer and you won’t be able to get them out. With clear coats, I sometimes use 1000 or 1200 too but no higher. 

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Boo
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04/08/2021 10:47 pm  

@robin If you have already sanded it with 400, sand those scratches out with 600 at least and apply more clear coats. Be very careful not to sand through your sealer and into your colour stain/dye. It’s not the end of the world if you can’t get all of the 400 scratches out, it will teach you that it is too coarse for any future painting jobs you do. You will only see them up close, from a distance, it will be fine. There will be plenty more guitars to paint, I’m sure. Just have fun and learn as you go along. 

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Robin
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05/08/2021 10:10 am  

@boo

If you have already sanded it with 400, sand those scratches out with 600 at least and apply more clear coats.

. I think 400 is a bit too coarse, use 600 or 800, otherwise you will see those 400 scratches in your clear lacquer and you won’t be able to get them out. With clear coats, I sometimes use 1000 or 1200 too but no higher. 

I'll get some finer grits ordered, there's no way I'm risking sanding through the sealer after all the time I've spent putting it on.


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Robin
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26/08/2021 10:09 am  

Hi @boo can I have some of your expert advice please.  I'm up to 12 coats of laquer now and sanded with 1000 grit and got rid of all the tiny runs and ripples that I couldn't see before I sanded. Should I leave it at that for polishing or put a wet coat on it and sand again.

20210824 170016

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Boo
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26/08/2021 10:43 am  

I'm up to 12 coats of laquer now and sanded with 1000 grit and got rid of all the tiny runs and ripples that I couldn't see before I sanded. Should I leave it at that for polishing or put a wet coat on it and sand again.

@robin Right, what I would do is give it a couple more coats. Before you do, be aware that because you have flattened it (sanded it with 1000g), it is now very smooth so it will be easier to get runs when you apply more lacquer. Not only that, you will have sanded off quite a bit too so there is no longer as much lacquer on there as you first sprayed on. I would actually be tempted to go back a grade in wet and dry paper to about 800g, just a light sand, don’t sand through. This is just to give the surface a better key for the new lacquer to hold on to.
Clean it off thoroughly (this is where compressed air comes in handy, to blow off dust) and warm your can of lacquer in a tub of hot water about 15mins before you spray. Shake the can well and wipe off the excess water from the can, you don’t want that dripping onto your guitar. 

For the first new coat of lacquer you should spray on a very light coat. You need to be further away from the surface of the guitar and move across the surface slower than normal (because you are further away). When you depress the nozzle on the can, do so before the paint/lacquer is to hit the surface of the guitar, you want a nice controlled action. Also, only release the nozzle when you have gone past where you want the lacquer to be on the guitar. A lot of people only try to put lacquer only on where they want it, thinking they are saving lacquer. So the action is: paint on before it reaches the surface, then move across the project to get lacquer onto the surface, go past the end of the project/guitar, then stop the paint/lacquer by taking your finger off the nozzle. If you notice the fan of the lacquer as it comes out of the nozzle, you should start at the top of the project, spray across, then move down and spray back across moving down the project, with a 50% overlap on each pass. This will give you a nice consistent coat over the whole project, rather than blotchy bits that will run or sag. 

The trick is, to slow down and relax. Spraying a bit further away will allow you to be more controlled, consistent and less likely to get any runs etc. 

So, certainly for the first new coat, make sure it’s light, it’s ok if it’s a little dry looking. Let that coat flash off, it shouldn’t take long to dry, and it should also act as a gripper coat for the next coat you spray on. You can then give the whole guitar another coat, this time it can be a little wetter, but not too much. You need a “Goldilocks” coat, not too dry, not too wet, just right. Leave that a little longer to flash off and if you have any lacquer left, you could give it another Goldilocks coat if you want or just leave it, you will have to make the judgment. 

Another point to consider, is that you will be sanding it and polishing it in a week or two so don’t get too hung up on what the finish looks like when you’ve just sprayed it. 

Sorry, I’ve rambled on a bit and written a small essay. 

Hope this helps, let me know how you get on. 
Happy spraying. 
Boo. 🤘😜🤘🎸

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Robin
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26/08/2021 10:59 am  

Thanks for taking the time with that comprehensive advice @boo . I'll get it prepped for more lacquer and wait for the right weather conditions again before spraying. 


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Boo
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26/08/2021 11:09 am  

Thanks for taking the time with that comprehensive advice @boo . I'll get it prepped for more lacquer and wait for the right weather conditions again before spraying. 

No problem @robin if you spray lighter coats, it’s less likely that you will experience blooming too. It’s always best to wait for good conditions though. 👍 

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Robin
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30/08/2021 6:14 pm  

Another little step forward, the waterslide decals are on the headstock now.

20210830 175744

 


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Boo
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30/08/2021 8:36 pm  

Another little step forward, the waterslide decals are on the headstock now.

@robin Nice, looks good Robin. 👍

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Clinton
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01/09/2021 3:56 pm  

My condolonces. Looking real good finishing.


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Robin
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13/09/2021 3:22 pm  

Couldn't resist a little trial fit of the tuners. I need to build up more lacquer though,  I can still see and feel the edges of the logos. However, I totally forgot about the nut when I was positioning the logos, I'm going to have to make a smaller truss rod cover.

20210913 152010

 

 


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Boo
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13/09/2021 6:23 pm  

Couldn't resist a little trial fit of the tuners

@robin Looking good Robin, I’ve done the same thing with a truss rod cover before. Every day is a school day eh? 😁👍

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Russ
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13/09/2021 11:53 pm  

Your certainly my goto logo man @robin. Very nice. 

🙂🎸🎶🙏

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Robin
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14/09/2021 12:24 pm  

@russ

Your certainly my goto logo man

All l can do is black inkjet waterslide and that took a lot of trial and error, I've got enough for my next four builds though. I tried colour too, but it was too see through.


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Russ
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14/09/2021 1:57 pm  

All l can do is black inkjet waterslide and that took a lot of trial and error, I've got enough for my next four builds though. I tried colour too, but it was too see through.

All that trial and error @robin will give you the knowledge of what not to do. 😁😂

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